The Role of the Member

You are the most important person in our Toastmaster club! Yes you mister or misses 20-year member and you too our very newest member.

How can all of you be the most important person?

It’s because each one of you participates in their own way to contribute to the good health of their club. Regardless of what role you have on the agenda, your most important role is to be a supportive club member. That means, even on those nights your name isn’t on the agenda, you’ve got a vital role: audience member.

When you don’t show up on those nights you don’t have an assigned role, you relinquish the key role of audience member. The speakers don’t get your written evaluations of their speeches. Our Table Topics Master can’t give you a table topic. Your voice is missing from the decision-making that happens in our business meetings. And, we’ll look around and we’ll just plain miss you!

It’s all about supporting your club and your fellow members.

It’s the same thing when a member doesn’t show up for a meeting where they have an assigned role and neglected to find a replacement. One quick email to  other members without roles often can produce immediate results.

If you just drop the ball, the club suffers. We have one less person on our agenda and when it’s a speaker or evaluator or other key role we all suffer. But we all suffer when we’re missing a greeter or timer or other role.

First Oakville Toastmasters isn’t a social club (but we do have a social program) but offers an educational experience. That educational experience includes learning what it means to be integral with keeping our word. When we say we will do something, we do everything we can to keep it. This is part of the leadership aspect of the program.

When we don’t keep our commitments, everybody notices and it’s human nature that everyone remembers. In Toastmasters that might not be as critical as failing in a work or family situation but the consequences are similar.

BTW when we fail (and we all do fail), it’s a pretty good gesture to apologize to those who were affected by our neglectful actions. Sometimes it’s to one person and it can be done privately. Sometimes the entire club needs to hear from you (and don’t ask how I know this to be true) but it can be very emotionally freeing to say you’re sorry when you’ve done something problematic that affected everyone.

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