What Happens When I Don’t Show Up?

It’s that season again when meeting chairs find they are scrambling to put on meetings where members either haven’t shown up or failed to find a replacement by leaving the search to the last minute.

We go through this problem every spring (Is it the nice weather?) and every year we come up with the same solution. (Call on the mentors to get involved with their delinquent mentees.)

For the most part the problem of no-shows is confined to new members (Sorry if this offends any newcomers but it is what it is.) who don’t appreciate the magnitude of the problems they create when they don’t show up or wait until the last second to find a replacement.

It means the chair can’t print their agendas until the last second. It can also mean that the chair, the Toastmaster, the GE, the VP of Ed., your mentor and maybe even our club president get dragged into finding a replacement because you didn’t fulfill your obligation of finding a replacement. (These are busy people in their own lives and they’re not your parents.)

This showing up piece is part of the educational and leadership learning that takes place at First Oakville Toastmasters. There are lots of other clubs that aren’t so fussy and maybe that would be a better fit if you are a habitual offender.

But before you go, consider what letting down your fellow club members says about you? Not a pretty picture is it? (And, one truism I’ve learned is how we are in one thing, we are in all things. So if you’re a no-show at Toastmasters, you’re likely a no-show in other areas of your life.) At Toastmasters you get a real opportunity to change yourself and change your world. This is a gift of immense value.

When you consider the people you’ve let down at the meeting are potential new employers for you or new associates who might have written a letter of recommendation for you in your personal job search it becomes pretty obvious that these are not people you want to disappoint.

So how do you make certain this never happens to you again?

First call (or get) your mentor for help with your upcoming assignments. Read your speech if you have to but show up when you’re scheduled and do your best. Your fellow members will see that you’re struggling and they will help you. (If you don’t show up nobody knows if you need or even want some help.)

Don’t blow off what may seem like minor roles like greeting. Our greeters are our first-line offense when it comes to attracting new members. (We need to find at least 10 new members annually to qualify for the Distinguished Club Program.)

Every role in Toastmasters is important regardless of whether you are listed on the agenda or not. But if you are listed on the agenda and you don’t show up everybody knows. There’s no place to hide at Toastmasters and sooner or later the VP of Education will remove your name from the upcoming schedules.

And if you do show up and do the work, what does that say about you?

It says you are a person whose word can be trusted. You do what you say you’re going to do. You’re excellent executive material. You will make a fine mentor for newcomers. Maybe one day you’ll accept the role of president or area or divisional director.

But most of all, you’ll know yourself as someone who can count on themselves to show up and get the job done.

 

 

 

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